Among the many things that bothered me about John McCain’s performance in last night’s debate was this exchange:

I voted for Justice Breyer and Justice Ginsburg. Not because I agreed with their ideology, but because I thought they were qualified and that elections have consequences when presidents are nominated. This is a very important issue we’re talking about.

Senator Obama voted against Justice Breyer and Justice Roberts on the grounds that they didn’t meet his ideological standards. That’s not the way we should judge these nominees. Elections have consequences. They should be judged on their qualifications. And so that’s what I will do.

I believe McCain was referring to Obama voting against Justice Alito (or was it Harriet Miers), because Obama was not an elected official in 1994 when Justice Breyer was nominated and could not have possibly voted against his appointment to the bench.

McCain has a history of misspeaking when he should be more thoughtful and deliberate (like when he mistakenly referred to Spain as a Latin American country).

He may know what he’s talking about and can’t express it accurately under pressure (a trait many share), but the job of President of the United States is a job rife with pressure.  If he can’t get the simplest facts straight when speaking to an American audience, how can I trust that he will get them right when negotiating with foreign countries or solving big problems?  His habit of speaking erroneously is not a trivial matter.

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